Plans for Hurt Park and The Homeless Article

My plans for the Built Environment Analysis is to include multiple pages or posts connected to a main menu that will introduce sub headers including the Introduction, Background, The Built Environment Itself, General Consensus, Conclusion. Below is a small sketch of what I intend the menu page to look like with images that either I have taken or have creative commons right to use. I plan to have all images hyperlinked as well leading to the posts themselves another thing that may be slightly different is the number of columns for different posts I will create.

Main Menu Concept Page Sketch drawn and taken by Arnas Ribaciauskas

I will strive to have my main opening image to draw an emotional draw or add attention to the topic at hand. my topic deal with the homeless problem in a bit of a serious tone and issues that fixed furniture throughout parks attracts the homeless population. I have personally taken some photos and videos of the location itself and have permission from the people who are in the photos as well. Having said this I have yet to find all their placements and still don’t know exactly what my header image is but will show something that has a sense of pity or emotional heartbreak to draw my readers in.

 

Finally I have yet to decide to have a lower menu to flip through the posts or just have a lower right hand and left hand corner hyperlink that sends you to the next page in a linear chronological fashion. I’m still considering many things.

Collaborative Annotated Bibliography for “Digital Atlanta: A collaborative approach to remapping Atlanta’s past”

Page, M., Hurley, H., Collins, B., Glover, J. B., Bryant, R., Clark, E., Davis, M., Gue, R., Melton, S. V. H., Miller, B., Pierce, M. L., Slemons, M., Varner, J., Wharton, R.(2015). Digital Atlanta: A collaborative approach to remapping Atlanta’s past. 2015 Digital Heritage.

 

Authors Page, M.C, Hurley, J.H., Collins, B., Glover, J.B., Bryant, R., Clark, E., Davis, M., Gue, R., Van Horn Melton, S.,  Miller, B.,  Pierce, M.L., Slemons, M., Varner, J. and Wharton. R. argue that a successful, interdisciplinary collaboration is possible to yield advances in digital historiography. The article provides examples of technology that is used by students along with historical context to help bring about about an innovative approach of remapping Atlanta’s past. The main goal of the “Digital Atlanta” article is about Georgia State and Emory Universities combined efforts throughout digital projects to address Atlanta’s archaeological built environments and past achievements through digital databases such as; geo-databases, spatial history tools and digital map collections. The target audience of this article are those to work and inhabit the city of Atlanta. This is known from the consistent use of the pronoun, “we”. This implies that the authors are communicating as a whole/community. City planners, historiographers, archaeologists, urban geographers, people in CIS professions, and students who study government, geology/geography, history, information systems, or modeling may find this work useful because this article collaborates varied and specific skills from numerous professions on the history of Atlanta along with the process of a digital remapping of the city. This cross section of skills provides reference for students and professionals as to how their abilities continue to contribute to a greater understanding of history and science.

Useful Quotations

Key to these projects is public engagement and inclusion to create a reciprocal system to better understanding where we have been, where we stand, and where we are going as citizens of Atlanta” (sec. VI).

“The Atlanta 3D Explorer production is a collaboration with nVis360, MARBL, ECDS staff and students to create an interactive virtual city circa 1930 built off the 1928 map.” (sec. IV).

“Because these archaeological materials have accompanying contextual data, they can more easily be connected with other datasets, such as development maps and historical texts, to create a more holistic understanding of the various processes that impacted individuals and shaped the development of the city” (sec. III). ← Thomas and Avery

“…digital heritage projects could potentially synthesize their material and standardize or consolidate their digitization, mapping, and/or modeling efforts to tell the story of a city” (sec. VI). ← Thomas and Avery

Conference with Ms. Madden

I went to a appointment I had scheduled with Ms. Madden on Friday the 24th for 2:00 PM, to study for more sources and other research databases I did not use for my annotated bibliographies. Luckily another student didn’t show up for their appointment on time, but I was able to stay for an hour talking though my subject. The key areas that I wanted to focus on with Ms. Madden was the relationship between the homeless and resident owners with set homes, also how Georgia State addresses the homeless, and how parks accommodate the homeless. She showed me the Atlanta Journal and Constitution, this newspaper addresses articles that related back to my subject matter and allowed me to look throughout all their newspaper articles that affect this subject. She also readdressed how to use the Georgia State Library service and find my secondary sources that may be useful as well. Finally we couldn’t together find an exact statement at all  from Georgia State about the homeless, even though it has such a huge impact on normal campus life.

 

Sources:

http://search.proquest.com/atlantajournalconstitution?accountid=11226

library.gsu.edu

Hurt Park, the homeless and their impacts on residents of Atlanta Annotated Bibliography First Five

Broad Question: How does the built environment of XXX shape the behavior, attitudes, beliefs of XXX in those spaces.

How does the location and placement of benches throughout Hurt park shape the attitudes and behavior of Atlantans toward the homeless?

The exact location and the placement of fixed furniture throughout Hurt park draws a large number of the homeless community, which creates a sense of discomfort and intended ignorance from the residents of the surrounding Atlanta area.

Illegal to be Homeless. (n.d.). Retrieved March 13, 2017, from

http://www.nationalhomeless.org/publications/crimreport/meanestcities.html

The National Coalition for the Homeless in an article labeled A DREAM DENIED:

THE CRIMINALIZATION OF HOMELESSNESS IN U.S. CITIES” specifically “#4 Atlanta, GA” states that there is inherent and biased negatives to being homeless from the legal system itself, poorly given out resources to public shelters to address these issues. This articles brings up city legislation in Atlanta that banned panhandling and gave examples of public outcry from opponents of this resolution including quotes from senator Vincent Fort against this decision. The main goal of the article is to bring out the unknown hardships homeless people endure while also showing the flaws in our community in how we judge and access them. The intended audience is civil rights activists, social justice members, and residents of Atlanta who resonate with this peace and want to bring change to the system they viewed is flawed. This article allows the reader to get a better understanding of what homeless people go through and how some legislation was made to specifically target them just to be rid of their existence.

Municode Library. (2017, March 9). Retrieved March 12, 2017, from

https://www.municode.com/library/ga/atlanta/codes/code_of_ordinances?nodeId=COORATGEVOII_CH106OFMIPR_ARTIINGE_S106-12URCAIMUSPUPL

The City of Atlanta, state government legislation addresses the “Atlanta, Georgia – Code of Ordinances” which states all the legal laws and rules dealing with Atlanta’s law specifically Sec. 106-12. – Urban camping and improper use of public places, that addresses the current laws when dealing with the homeless and loitering issues.  It directly describes the exact binding law and ordinance and the specific cases of how each definition is being used and how words stated are meant to be interpreted with a known meaning, when brought up later. The general purpose of this website is to allow anyone the easy and anonymous access to active Atlanta city laws as they are currently being updated and maintained. The intended audience is state of Georgia residents, more specifically those in the Atlanta city area, so that they may be accustomed to the understanding of this cities laws and regulations. This source is incredibly useful in showing the way the city of Atlanta addresses the homeless and those who are described by Sec. 106-12 when dealing with urban camping.

 

Newburn, T., & Rock, P. (2004, December). Living in Fear: Violence and Victimisation in the

Lives of Single Homeless People . Retrieved March 12, 2017, from http://www.crisis.org.uk/data/files/publications/LivingInFear_prelim%5B1%5D.pdf

Tim Newburn and Paul Rock are credited academic authors who have written and documented many criminalizations, injustices, and policies throughout the justice system, including writing “Living in Fear: Violence and Victimisation in the Lives of Single Homeless People” which documents and describes the victimization and mistreatment the homeless community withstands on a regular basis as compared to the general public. The statistics, and data are from cities and suburbs throughout the United Kingdom during 2004, they focus primarily on victimization and personal accounts through sample sized thorough interviews with unbiased questioning. The purpose of the article is to address the research that suggests that homeless people are less likely the perpetrators of a crime and more likely the victims, this in turn is to help change reader’s views on the way the view the homeless and crime. The intended audience are those who study criminology and flaws in the justice system, as well as lawmakers and academics who wish to change socially unjust norms. This article not only addresses hidden struggles that homeless people deal with on a regular basis it also addresses the criminology and unjustness they are given through facts, studies, reports and data tables showing the communities victimization.

Priestley, J. L. (2014, July). 2013 Report on Homelessness. Retrieved March 8, 2017, from

http://www.dca.ga.gov/housing/specialneeds/programs/documents/DCAHomelessnessReport2013.pdf

Georgia’s Department of Community Affairs, a subset of Georgia’s state government released “2013 Report on the Homeless” where they address the how the government defines homelessness, increasing and decreasing homeless population in counties, how long a person remains homeless on average in Georgia and more. All of the state’s conducted statistics come from credible sources and are based on homeless communities found throughout the report from graphs, data tables, maps and tables relating specifically to the addressed issue. The main point of the article is to bring awareness and track shifts in homelessness throughout Georgia, by analyzing shifting populations, densities and recurrence rates in Georgia. The intended audience is the civil rights activists, population and social class analysts and those who deal with and are interested in solving homeless community issues in Georgia. This article brings up real statistics of changing demographics of homeless people’s population, it also shows where there is more emphasis or demand to reduce the problem based on how large the issue is in certain areas.

Spann, A. (2016, April 28). Allison Spann’s Blog. Retrieved March 13, 2017, from

http://sites.gsu.edu/aspann4/2016/04/28/resources-for-my-analysis/zt

Allison Spann, a Georgia State University student addresses the close relationship between the homeless community and university students and why Georgia State attracts so many residents without a home in What Makes Georgia State University Attractive to the Homeless”. The Article addresses locations between the university and public transportation, showing maps and comparison between the other closest university Georgia Tech, it also show crime statistics and public access to these universities addressing diagrams of Atlanta and descriptive details of the university settings. The article’s main points are to bring awareness to the homeless people issue that is growing throughout the university and bring change by making a call to action to help alleviate this issue. The intended audience includes other Georgia State students and faculty to not be as frightful of their appearance and also to try and help their situation through charity work or donating to nonprofit causes.  This article goes in detail to describe experiences that students at this university have and brings data and evidence to back up the claims of increased traffic to Georgia State University.

College Football Hall of Fame Interaction Time Data Table

Ticket Booths and Frontal Entrance

College Football Hall of Fame Interaction Time. Data Collected By Arnas Ribaciauskas

Under this extension, a ticket stand is located where the work “Tickets” is colored in black with a white outline and is placed above 5 glass booths indented into the building.  An archway of shade is created by the massive football building with its football design. In front of the glass booths lie 3 rows of 5 black, metallic interchangeable line posts  with extendable belts linked to ease other in a letter “F” design. 14 more black metallic interchangeable line posts connected to the building frontal exit in the shape of a “L” design. 7 people waited in line while 2 people went up to the booth at a time, where only the 3rd to left and 2nd to right booth were open and dealing with guests.  8 males and 1 female waited in line all wearing jean pants. All but 1 male who was at the front of the line were wearing long sleeve jackets or hoodies. Each interaction lasted approximately 1 minute 34 seconds on average with a sample size of  9 guests over a period of 20 minutes.  To the left side of the ticket booth lied a large “V” shaped support column made of concrete protruded from the ground into the ceiling of the outside ticket booths and large black cylindrical metallic trashcans  that was 3 and half feet tall by 2 feet wide. At the right of the ticket booth was a display monitor behind a Plexiglas screen that stated “Tickets Available 24/7 AT CFDHALL.COM” with the College Football Hall of Fame museum logo beneath the text.

My Experience at The College Football Hall of Fame

Main Building a Frontal view of the College Football Hall of Fame. Photo taken by Arnas Ribaciauskas

My Experiences

The front entrance of the College Football Hall of Fame Museum speaks and expels a level of uniqueness and amazement.  I remember from my 15 minute walk to the location, the sudden “wow!” I exclaimed as the building first came into view. It not only looked architecturally stunning with its unique modern design it also had brought the whole area to life. The building was about 4 stories tall but when I went to visit around 2 pm the sun was shining right above the building illuminating the street and  surrounding buildings.

I also enjoyed seeing people walking around wearing football jerseys even if some were NFL, not college football team jerseys. these jerseys also brought up trauma I retained after this years super bowl after my home state Georgia’s  Atlanta Falcons finally entered the finals and choked with over a 20 point lead to the New England Patriots.  I’m not a huge fan of college football but I appreciate the sport a lot and watch a game here and there, so there may be a slight exaggeration to how stunning the building maybe to others. The weather also felt very refreshing on this day with clear skies, bright sun but no glaring heat, it was a perfect day to visit. When I monitored and observed the front entrance and began marking details interesting things happened, I witnessed a car collision, 3 charter buses taking in a lot of people wearing matching yellow shirts and people tripping. The ticket booth close up look like nothing special but the scenery around it and how it was built into the football itself I found to be pretty cool. Overall while listening to music I thoroughly enjoyed myself just watching people get there tickets and head inside. It was relaxing.

America’s Pastime Sport Here in Atlanta

College Football Hall of Fame Building

College Football Hall of Fame Outer Building Design, Taken February 10th 2017 at 2:12 PM EST by Arnas Ribaciauskas

The College Football Hall of Fame is located in front of the intersection between Park Ave West NW and Marietta St.  In front of these streets lies the entrance and front building of the museum. The surrounding area smelled of industrial fumes from car exhaust to concrete and new plastic. Noise level was filled with car horns, engine pistons rotating and pedestrians walking; the clanking noise created from hard bottom shoes hitting concrete sidewalks. This new building  opened in August 2014 (College Football Hall of Fame). It opened with the help of Coca Cola, AT&T, KIA, and Chick Fil A as founding partners. It currently draws numerous people from around the US to visit (Atlanta Fan Attraction).

Ticket Stand for College Football Hall of Fame, Taken February 10th 2017 at 2:29 PM EST by Arnas Ribaciauskas

The left wing of the building is shaped as a football in kick off position where the pointed ends face upwards towards the sky. The pointed ends of the egg shaped building are also cut off horizontally. This section of the building is covered with brown flat water resistant panels. Each Panel is 6 Feet tall and is slightly curved in order to create the scale of a giant football. The words “College Football Hall of Fame” is written on the upper section of the wing in white, balanced by 5 beams that interconnect to hold the letters up. Below these letters a square extensions extends from the building with 4 glass panels built in that allow sunlight to pass through.

 

Citations:

Atlanta Fan Attraction. (n.d.). Retrieved February 13, 2017, from http://www.cfbhall.com/

College Football Hall of Fame. (2017, February 19). Retrieved February 13, 2017, from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/College_Football_Hall_of_Fame

My Analysis: The Varsity: A Deconstruction (Visual) Document

1. What are the posts doing?
It vividly describes the scenery and individual items normally seen in a restaurant but allows the reader to visualize specific descriptions through its large amount of detail.
2. What is the message of each post?
This message in this one is to create a visual representation of a purely written description of a restaurant and allow readers to feel as if they could see and feel the restaurant.
3. Who is the intended audience? How do you know?
Sociologists, Anthropologists, People who are doing research into the descriptive settings of settings, this being the Varsity restaurant. It goes into great length going into individually focused items located throughout the restaurant with vivid detail.
4. How might the information be useful? To Whom? Why?
People who are doing research throughout the Varsity will appreciate the detail and descriptive features mentioned from pepper shakers, to napkins.
5. How does the author establish credibility?(ethos)  
The author has been to the restaurant showing he has taken his own photos spent time gathering a large amount of objective data.
6. What could be changed to improve the effectiveness of each post?
For this specific article, a large more broad description on the setting, describing spacing and spacial awareness.

Link to the Article addressed: http://sites.gsu.edu/mmolini1/2016/10/02/the-varsity-a-deconstruction-visual/